Site map    |       Subscription    |     Russian

Archive

<< < October 2012 > >>
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31        

News

European publishers lend a helping hand to the newsstands, while the Russian ones’ don’t notice distribution market problems

European newspapers’ and magazines’ publishers have just recovered from the shock experienced after Internet mass media occurrence. And tried to find a new way to their business.

And they did it! They understood that newspapers, magazines and books’ sales decreased, but Internet and devices’ spread is not the main reason. We can blame the reduction of press distribution channels and their inefficiency in the new environment. Media business representatives have suddenly recognized that we must try to help newsstands and invest in its advertising.

The situation on the Russian market is terrible: newspapers, magazines and books’ sales and bookstores’ and newsstands’ number decrease. But a lot of our publishers misunderstand this tragic situation. Most backward Russian publishers display market ignorance in the part of building qualitative product.

On the Distripress Congress in Glasgow (Scotland) took part more than 1,000 delegates (the publishers and distributors from more than 1000 countries). Over the past four days, they have done a great job of finding ways to overcome the crisis in the global media market. There were suggested a lot of proposals and as a result the magical formula of three digits was sounded: "10, 1 and 7". 10% is the maximum percentage of the top publishers’ revenue derived from the Internet, 1% is marginal profits from electronic sales of Google's content, and 7 is an indicator of Congress delegates optimism on a ten-system.

It was fun that there weren’t Russian publishers in this international laboratory of the development and overcoming the crisis in the media industry. There were a lot of distributors, but any publishers. Maybe because they think that it’s everything fine in Russia. Maybe it's because of our own way. Question is: “Where are we going?” In any case, the majority of Russian publishers don’t understand the role of distribution channels. Only a few does, but, unfortunately, they were not in Glasgow.

Alexander Oskin

Sourse: PDA